What does my payment mean?

See an example statement and read FAQs to understand how your royalties are calculated.

PPL produces a statement for each member payment. You can access your statements by logging into the myPPL online account and selecting ‘My Statements’. Click on the blue icons below to read additional information on each section of your statement.

If you are still unsure about your statement, please read the payment FAQs below or contact our Member Services team.

These are your unique PPL membership details. Please quote your member ID whenever you contact PPL.
This is the total amount you have been paid.
The annual payment for PPL members, covers UK royalties for recordings which have been played in public and/or included in radio and TV broadcasts. This statement line will usually indicate which year the payment relates to (eg, 2010).
If for any reasons PPL cannot pay all the royalties due to a member, interest will be accrued and added to the original amount.
These are royalty payments from music licensing companies in other countries. Each of these lines on your statement shows (from left to right): the country where the royalties have been collected; the name of the music licensing company; the type of royalty; the period to which the payment relates; and what tax and other costs have been deducted. Please note that track breakdowns are not always available for these payments. You will only receive these payments if you have given an international mandate to PPL.
If you are a member of the BPI, AIM or FAC, some or all of your membership fees for these organisations are payable as a deduction from your PPL royalties. Details of any of these deductions which are applicable to you will be shown in this section.
There are two types of Withholding Tax that may be deducted. ‘Withholding Tax on Interest’ can be deducted on any interest payments you receive. ‘Withholding Tax on Royalty’ can be deducted on UK source income paid to certain members whose usual place of address is outside of the UK.
Your account may have money deducted for several reasons. For example, PPL recalculates the royalties allocated to recordings based on new or updated information, such as additional performers being included on a recording's performer line-up. PPL continuously recalculates payments made in relation to our open distribution period (typically up to six years) – so, if you were paid too much in a previous year, some money may be deducted and re-allocated to reflect the new information that PPL has. Please read our payment FAQs for more information.
PPL rights holder members who are VAT registered are entitled to receive VAT on any PPL payments, as HM Revenue & Customs rule that you are supplying PPL with the public performance and broadcast rights to your recorded music. If you are a PPL rights holder member please supply us with a copy of your VAT certificate to ensure your PPL payments include VAT, if you have not already done so. If you are a PPL performer member then you will not receive VAT on PPL payments. This is because HMRC rule that these royalties are collected on behalf of performers and no rights are actually transferred to PPL.

The 'My Statements' section in a myPPL account will list every payment received separately. By selecting one of the options, you can view your statement, related tax documentation and a CSV file of payment breakdown at track level. (Please note that breakdowns may not be available for international payments.)

You can also see an example Revenue Analysis statement report here


Understanding your payments

Find out when you should get paid and what your statement means:

  • When will I get paid?
    • PPL makes an annual distribution to its members for UK revenue, scheduled for June each year. Royalties generated internationally and through certain additional licensing activities is paid separately throughout the year. See the payment dates.

      Valid repertoire must be registered with PPL by 30 January 2015 to be included in the main annual UK distribution for 2014.
  • Do I receive VAT on my PPL royalties?
    • PPL rightholder members who are VAT registered are entitled to receive VAT on any PPL payments, as HM Revenue & Customs rule that you are supplying PPL with the public performance and broadcast rights to your recorded music. If you are a PPL rightholder member please supply us with a copy of your VAT certificate to ensure your PPL payments include VAT, if you have not already done so.

      If you are a PPL performer member then you will not receive VAT on PPL payments. This is because HMRC rule that these royalties are collected on behalf of performers and no rights are actually transferred to PPL.
  • Why haven't I been paid?
    • If you are a registered PPL member and have been expecting a payment that has not arrived, there could be several reasons why:

      Incorrect bank/address details
      PPL cannot make any payments if bank details are incorrect or if there is not a correct address listed in a member's myPPL online account. The money will be held until the details are corrected.

      Account has a negative balance
      Your account may have a negative balance for several reasons. Find out more about negative balances. Future royalties will be used to make up the deficit.

      Earned less than the minimum payment/threshold
      PPL will only pay if the account has earned £5.00 or more for UK payments and £50 for international payments.

      The recording is invalid
      PPL will not pay out to recording rightholders for recordings that are incorrect or incomplete in the PPL Repertoire Database. It is the responsibility of the recording rightholder to ensure the data is correct. Performer payments are not affected by a recording being classed as invalid.

      Your performance is not linked to a recording
      A performer member must be listed on a recording in the PPL Repertoire Database as a contributor before being paid for that recording. How do I make a claim?

      Your recording has not been played in public or broadcast
      If a member believes that their repertoire has been played in public or broadcast but they have not subsequently been paid, they may raise a query with PPL.

      Members must raise a query within six months of the distribution and within three months of an adjustment (where the member receives their first payment as a result), and may submit multiple queries at the same time. An adjustment is where PPL changes allocations for a previous year based on newly available information. If PPL accepts queries outside these timescales, then PPL will charge a fee of £50 that is refundable if, after looking into the query, the member earns more than £50. Once a distribution has been closed (i.e. after 7 years), PPL will not accept any usage investigations for the years closed.

      Please note that payment is not guaranteed if your recording is shown as having had 'Airplay Reported' in the PPL Repertoire Database. This data only indicates that the recording has been played at some point, but it may only be for a very small amount of money or cannot yet be paid because of other factors.

      If you wish to submit a query, complete the Music Usage Investigation Request form and email it to memberservices@ppluk.com.
  • Why can't I access my old statements (pre-July 2011)?
    • PPL has recently launched a new and improved payment system. Statements for any payments made before July 2011 were only available through the previous version of myPPL, which is now closed.

      Statements from July 2011 and onwards are now available in your new myPPL online account. Members are able to view their statements by logging into myPPL and selecting 'My Statements'.

      If you require a statement dated prior to July 2011, please contact us on 020 7534 1234 or email memberservices@ppluk.com.
  • Why does my PPL statement show different use from my PRS for Music statement?
    • If you have both a PPL and PRS for Music account (for example if you are both a performer and a song-writer) then you may receive payments from both companies in respect of the same licensees and licence periods. However, these payments will not necessarily be comparable or in the same proportions.

      PPL and PRS for Music often license the same businesses but our tariff rates may be different. Many, but not all, of these licensees will tell both PPL and PRS for Music about the music they have played. PPL and PRS for Music separately identify (match) the recordings that are used by their licensees and each has its own distribution policy.

      PPL is currently working with PRS for Music to see how we can align our internal processes, leading to more consistent results.

      Find out more about how PPL distributes the royalties
  • Are there any recording breakdowns for international payments?
    • PPL does not often receive this detailed level of information from music licensing companies in other countries and so cannot include the payment breakdown on your statement. We are working on introducing this information into the statements where it is available. For now if you require a track breakdown for international payments please contact us on 020 7534 1234. Please note that this information is not available for some countries. 
  • How can I earn more from PPL?
    • Once you have registered as a PPL member, there are numerous ways to make sure you are earning the most you can from your recordings or performances. Find out more.
  • Can I check how much money I'm earning on a particular track?
    • If you are registered with PPL as a performer or recording rightholder member you can access your statements via your online myPPL account. Once logged in, click on 'My Statements' to find a file (CSV file) which contains a breakdown of your earnings by recording for the UK.
  • Why haven’t I received a statement?
    • PPL only provides statements when payments are made. Therefore, where a performer’s account is already in a negative balance, when a negative allocation is applied this will not be identified in standard reporting. However, if you have any questions regarding this aspect of distributions of payments please contact PPL’s Member Services team. Read more about negative balances.
  • Does PPL make retrospective payments?
    • PPL makes adjustments to distributions for a period of up to six years, in line with the statutory limitation period. PPL no longer holds any revenue for distribution periods prior to 2004.

      The distribution period 2007 is expected to be closed in 2015.
  • What is an adjustment?
    • An adjustment is when PPL recalculates the royalties allocated to recordings based on new or updated information, such as recordings being made valid or additional performers being included on a recording's performer line-up. In an adjustment PPL does not pay out any new revenue; royalties that have been previously paid out are simply re-allocated to reflect the new information that PPL has.

      The adjustment process can result in either a positive or negative balance of royalties to performers and/or recording rights holders. Read more about negative balances.

      If you receive a payment in the adjustment you can access a statement in your myPPL account. (Please note that if your account has a negative balance then you will not receive a statement.) The payment amount shown in the CSV file may differ slightly to the amount displayed on the corresponding statement because track allocations under a penny are not shown on your CSV file. This discrepancy is intentional and won't change the amount you are paid.

      Please see the payment schedule to find out the date of the next adjustment.
  • Why is my statement showing a negative balance?
    • Your account may have a negative balance for several reasons. As a performer member, another performer might have made a successful claim on a recording you are currently linked to; you might have been listed incorrectly on a recording and been removed; or there might have been a change in your contribution category or listed country of residence.

      As a recording rightholder member, your recordings may have been transferred to another member; if performers have been added to your track; or you were paid an advance by PPL that your distribution did not match.
      Read more about negative balances.
  • Why has my account been debited?
    • Provided a performer's account has a positive balance, any negative allocations applied to the account will be clearly identified in the supporting statement. In this way the performer member will be able to ascertain what has triggered the negative allocation and clearly see the recording in respect to which the negative allocation has been made.

      PPL only provides statements when payments are made. Therefore where a performer's account is already in a negative balance, when a negative allocation is applied this will not be identified in standard reporting. However, if you have any questions regarding this aspect of distribtuions of payments please contact PPL's Member Services team.
  • My statement refers to the 'BGM Tribunal Refund' – what is this? 
    • This refers to PPL's background music tariff refund. Following a decision by the Copyright Tribunal in October 2009, PPL had to reduce its licence fees for playing background music in pubs, restaurants, hotels, shops, factories and offices. These revised licence fees were backdated to January 2006 and PPL consequently offered refunds to its affected licensees. The Copyright Tribunal decision means that each PPL member who received revenue for background music in 2006-09 was effectively overpaid. PPL has therefore been recouping these overpayments by making deductions to its main distributions in 2010 and 2011, with the final deduction scheduled for PPL's June 2012 distribution. The BGM deduction from your account has been calculated based on track earnings on the three background music tariffs across 2006-2009. PPL has considered the process carefully and engaged Deloitte to ensure that the deductions have been made fairly.
  • Why have I been deducted Withholding Tax?
    • There are two types of Withholding Tax that may be deducted from your PPL payments. 'Withholding Tax on Interest' can be deducted on any interest payments you receive, while 'Withholding Tax on Royalty' can be deducted on UK source income paid to certain members whose usual place of address is outside of the UK.

How do PPL distribute the royalties?

This section will explain how the PPL royalties are distributed between members:

  • Where do the royalties come from?
    • PPL collects money from those that play recorded music (broadcasters, businesses, venues and other licensees) and distributes the revenue to PPL recording rightholder and performer members based on which recordings have been used. See what happens to PPL's licence fees.
  • How is the money distributed between performers and recording rightsholders in the UK?
    • Where the money relates to the licensing of recorded music being played in public or broadcast (subject to the allocation of costs), one half of the money is allocated to the relevant recording rightsholder member and the other half is allocated to the performers who qualify to receive royalties on the recorded music track. Before a performer's share is distributed, PPL checks that the performer qualifies to receive 'equitable remuneration' in respect of that recorded music track. If the performer does not qualify in respect of that track then the obligation to pay equitable remuneration does not apply and the provisional allocation in respect of that performances is paid to the relevant recording rightsholder(s).

      If there is more than one performer listed on a recording, the performer royalties are distributed between them either in accordance with a performer share agreement or PPL's Performer Allocation Policy.

      Where the money relates to the licensing of an activity where performers do not have a right to receive royalties (such as the copying of the track) all the money is allocated to the relevant recording rightsholder.
      Find out more about how PPL distribute the royalties.

      Download the Performer Allocation Policy and Rights Holder Allocation Policy.
  • What's a performer share agreement?
    • As an alternative to PPL's standard Performer Allocation Policy, performers can specify to PPL how the performer royalties should be distributed among the contributors linked to a recording.

      Performer share agreements can cover either the share of the royalties that the featured performers receive or the entire allocation across all listed performers for that recording. Performer share agreements must contain the signature of all affected performers (so either all featured performers or all performers for that recording must sign) together with the written agreement of the recording rightsholder.

      A performer share agreement cannot affect payments retrospectively where it would result in a loss of revenue to any performer's previous PPL payments for that recording, or make a non-qualifying performer qualifying for PPL's purposes.

      To find out more or to request a performer share agreement form, please contact us at memberservices@ppluk.com or 020 7534 1234.
  • Where can I find PPL's distribution rules?

Increase your royalties

PPL collects royalties for our members from across the world. Sign up for this service and other available rights to earn the most you can.

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Contact us

For PPL membership enquiries, contact our Member Services team.

memberservices@ppluk.com 020 7534 1234
When will I get paid?

See dates for member payments throughout the year.

View payment schedule
Increase your royalties

PPL collects royalties for our members from across the world. Sign up for this service and other available rights to earn the most you can.

Earn more today
How are the royalties distributed?

See how PPL allocates money to its members - the performers and rightholders of recorded music.

Find out more